Mulled Apple Juice Recipe

This delicious mulled apple juice recipe is a must have in everyone’s cooking repetoire. It is a wonderful non-alcoholic alternative to mulled wine, ideal for entertaining kids and drivers. In winter, it is nice to have alternatives to wine and alcohol to serve your guests particular for after dinner and this recipe works a treat. Garnish with strips of orange peel and a cinnamon stick. Also a great beverage for getting you through Colds and Flus.

Ingredients:

* 1L apple juice
* strips of orange peel
* 1 cinnamon stick , plus extra to garnish, if you like
* 3 cloves
* sugar or honey, to taste

Method:

1. Simmer the apple juice with the strips of orange peel, cinnamon stick and cloves for about 5-10 mins until all the flavours have infused. Sweeten to taste.
2. Serve each drink with a little orange peel and a piece of cinnamon stick, if you like.

Health Benefits:

Cinnamon conveys numerous health benefits to the concsuer. In medicine it acts like other volatile oils and once had a reputation as a cure for colds. It has also been used to treat diarrhea and other problems of the digestive system. Cinnamon is high in antioxidant activity. The essential oil of cinnamon also has antimicrobial properties,which can aid in the preservation of certain foods.

Cinnamon could have some pharmacological effects in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. The plant material used in the study was mostly from Chinese cinnamon (see Chinese cinnamon’s medicinal uses). Recent studies in phytochemistry have indicated that cinnamtannin B1 isolated from C. verum bears possible therapeutic effect on type 2 diabetes, with the exception of the postmenopausal patients studied on C. Cassia. Cinnamon has traditionally been used to treat toothache and fight bad breath and its regular use is believed to stave off common cold and aid digestion.

Pharmacological experiments suggest that the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldehyde) activates the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells and may therefore represent an experimental chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Recent research documents anti-melanoma activity of cinnamic aldehyde observed in cell culture and a mouse model of human melanoma.

Regularly drinking tea made from the bark of Sri Lanka cinnamon could be beneficial to oxidative stress related illness in humans, as the plant part contains significant antioxidant potential.

VN:F [1.9.14_1148]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *